100 Things in Edinburgh

Click the images below to uncover hidden facts and things to do in Edinburgh, Scotland's historic capital city.

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Edinburgh Castle

Edinburgh Castle

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Prisoners of war from all over the world were held in the castle from 1757 until the early 19th century. This part of its past is literally written into the walls; one of the earliest depictions of the 'Stars and Stripes' on record can be found carved into a door by an American, and you can still see the hole where 49 French prisoners hacked their way through a wall and lowered themselves on ropes down the south crag in 1811 (all but one escaped).

One of the earliest depiction of the Stars and Stripes is in Edinburgh Castle. Find out more: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: © Courtesy of Historic Scotland

Arthur's Seat coffins

Arthur's Seat coffins

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In June 1836, five young boys found 17 miniature pine coffins on Arthur's Seat. Their origins are a mystery: it's been suggested that they were used by witches to cast death spells on specific individuals, or kept by sailors to protect against death. You'll find the carved figures (complete with clothes and painted boots) in the National Museum of Scotland.

In 1836, 17 miniature pine coffins were found on Arthur's Seat in Edinburgh. Find out more: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
The Writer's Museum, Makar's Court

The Writer's Museum, Makar's Court

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The pavement slabs around Lady Stair's House in Makar's Court are inscribed with quotes from Scottish writers. Inside the house you'll find the Writers' Museum, where the personal possessions and manuscripts of Robert Louis Stevenson, Sir Walter Scott and Robert Burns are laid out, as well as one of the best views of Edinburgh down the Mound.

The words of Scottish writers are on the pavement slabs in Makar's Court, Edinburgh. Find out more: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/
Edinburgh Playhouse

Edinburgh Playhouse

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The Edinburgh Playhouse is the largest theatre in the UK with a capacity of 3039 seats. Since it opened in 1929, acts such as David Bowie and even a live Indian elephant have graced the stage. The theatre also has a resident ghost called Albert who is said to haunt the building - and they even named a bar after him: Albert's Bar.

A live Indian elephant once appeared on stage @EdinPlayhouse. Find out more: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Ambassador Theatre Group

Royal Lyceum Theatre

Royal Lyceum Theatre

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Built in 1883 at a cost of £17,000, the Royal Lyceum is an example of late Victorian theatre architecture at its finest. The classical interior has a beautiful rectangular proscenium arch above the stage, which has a mural of The Muses on it for inspiration.

Edinburgh's @LyceumTheatre cost £17,000 to build in 1883. Find out more: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Floral Clock

Floral Clock

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Since 1903, Princes Street Gardens has been home to the world's oldest Floral Clock. It had to be wound daily up until 1972, but these days an electric motor keeps it ticking. It takes two gardeners five weeks to plant the 30,000 plants that make it bloom.

It takes two gardeners five weeks to plant 30,000 plants on Edinburgh's Floral Clock: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
The George Hotel

The George Hotel

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During World War II, the George Hotel was where millions of parcels containing cigarettes, matches, toothpaste, cocoa, chewing gum, paper and pencils were packed and dispatched to servicemen. The last time it was refurbished in 2006, a mummified cat was discovered hidden in the rafters. Intriguingly, they decided to leave it there for good luck.

When Edinburgh's George Hotel was refurbished, they found a mummified cat in the rafters: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Le Di-Vin

Le Di-Vin

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Le Di-Vin used to be a catholic church and meeting hall before being given over to Polish immigrants during World War II. These days it's a French wine bar with a large blackboard above the entrance showing a chalk drawing of the Last Supper. All the characters on the left of the door are famous Scots and those on the right are famous French people. The drawing was done by Olly, an Australian who worked behind the bar.

There's a wine bar in Edinburgh with an unusual chalk drawing of the Last Supper inside: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Alan Chalmers
Image: Oliver Miller (artist)

Anchor Close

Anchor Close

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The first edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica was printed and edited by William Smellie (pronounced Smiley) in this alley in 1771. Smellie also printed Robert Burns' poetry here a few years later in 1787.

The first edition of the Encyclopedia Britannica was printed in Edinburgh's Anchor Close: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
New Register House

New Register House

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The New Register House houses all the Scottish birth, death and marriage records dating back as far as 1553. Five tiers of galleries hold more than half a million volumes, and all are colour coded - red for births, black for death records and green for marriages.

There are half a million volumes of Scottish records in New Register House @natrecordsscot: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: John Lord via Flickr creative commons

Edinburgh's folly on Calton Hill

Edinburgh's folly on Calton Hill

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The National Monument was supposed to resemble the Parthenon in Athens and be a tribute to Scottish servicemen who died in the Napoleonic War. However, work was abandoned in 1822 due to funds drying up, so Charles Cockerell and William Playfair's monument became a subject of shame, dubbed "Scotland's Disgrace" and "Edinburgh's Folly".

Scotland's National Monument was once called 'Scotland's Disgrace'. http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Duncan Harris via Flickr

The Old City Observatory

The Old City Observatory

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The Old City Observatory was inspired by a Greek temple of the Four Winds. Linked closely to the Nelson Monument and its time ball, the central telescope was firmly rooted in volcano rock to ensure vibrations wouldn't affect the readings. The observatory was crucial to ships' captains, and was used to standardise railway timetables across Scotland in the 1850s and 60s.

Edinburgh's Old City Observatory was inspired by a Greek temple of the Four Winds: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Scott Monument

Scott Monument

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The memorial to Sir Walter Scott is the tallest monument to a writer in the world. It was designed by George Meikle Kemp, who won a competition to design a fitting tribute in 1936. On the way up you'll see Sir Walter Scott and his favourite dog, Maida, as well as sculptures of characters from his novels. It's over 200 steps to the top, but worth it for the view.

Edinburgh's memorial to Sir Walter Scott is the tallest monument to a writer in the world: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Edinburgh City of Literature
Image: © The Mallick Family via Creative Commons

The Caledonian Waldorf Astoria Edinburgh

The Caledonian Waldorf Astoria Edinburgh

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In Victorian times, this hotel was part of the old Caledonian railway station which stretched along the west end of Princes Street. Look out for the old station clock in the Peacock Alley bar; it still runs five minutes fast as it did back then, so passengers wouldn't be late for their trains.

The @WAEdinburgh has an old station clock which is set five minutes fast. Find out why: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
The Glasshouse Hotel

The Glasshouse Hotel

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The front of the hotel is what's left of the old Lady Glenorchy Church, which was built in 1846 and used until 1978. The church was demolished in 1986 to make way for the Glasshouse, leaving only the church's façade, which still stands today.

The front of @HotelGlasshouse used to be part of a church. Find out more: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
The Edinburgh Academical Football Club

The Edinburgh Academical Football Club

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The Edinburgh Academical Football Club (Accies) are the oldest rugby club in Scotland and the second oldest in the world. The first Club game was played at Raeburn Place and lasted four weeks, starting the last Saturday of 1857 and ending in January 1858. Both teams decided to play until the best of seven "goals" had been scored. It took four Saturdays to get a result, with the home team winning. The Club still plays its games on that same pitch, first used over 150 years ago.

The first Edinburgh Accies rugby game lasted four weeks in 1857. Find out more: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Wombat on the Royal Yacht Britannia

Wombat on the Royal Yacht Britannia

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Onboard the Royal Yacht Britannica there's a small toy wombat in the Officers' Wardroom, which the officers would use to play 'Wombat Tennis'. This involved two teams, a soft toy wombat and a lot of noise, as the wombat was thrown up into the revolving ceiling fan and the batting started. The toy had been donated by a Lady-in-Waiting on the understanding that it would receive love and affection, but it generally came off the worse for wear.

There's a small toy wombat in the Officers' Wardroom on the @BritanniaYacht. Find out more: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Edinburgh Books

Edinburgh Books

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This huge bookshop has been selling second-hand and antiquarian books for over 20 years. It's one of six independent book shops in the West Port area of Edinburgh, and home to Clarence the (stuffed) water buffalo; the shop's mascot and resident philosopher.

Independent book shop @EdinburghBooks is also home to a water buffalo called Clarence: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
The Blind Poet

The Blind Poet

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This pub was once the home of Thomas Blacklock, a famous poet who talked a young Robert Burns out of leaving Scotland, encouraging him to carry on writing. Blinded by smallpox as a child, Blacklock's visually vivid poems now adorn the walls of the pub, 30 metres down the road from where he's buried. You can also drop into their spoken word night, appropriately called "Blind Poetics".

There's poetry written on the walls at the @Blind_Poet pub in Edinburgh. Find out more: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Edinburgh Fireworks

Edinburgh’s Hogmanay Fireworks

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Edinburgh's world famous display involves 2,300 firework cues, triggering over 16,000 shots from 52 locations spread around Edinburgh Castle and Gardens. The display takes one week to design and choreograph, and two weeks for a team of six to manufacture and fuse. The Castle is then cleared within three hours so that it can open to the general public on New Year's Day as if nothing had happened.

Did you know? The annual @edhogmanay fireworks take two weeks to make and fuse: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Grant Ritchie, Real Edinburgh

Edinburgh Police Blue Boxes

Edinburgh Police Blue Boxes

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There were originally 85 blue police boxes around Edinburgh in the 1930s, used to hold criminals and as a base for bobbies on the beat. However now the boxes are gradually being decommissioned and sold off to become pop-up coffee shops, flower stalls and even art galleries; the only stipulation being that they have to be painted a different colour. You can still see an original box at Craigmillar police station.

Edinburgh's old blue police boxes are now coffee shops, flower stalls and art galleries. http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Kim Traynor via Creative Commons

The Queensferry Loony Dook

The Queensferry Loony Dook

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The annual New Years Day swim in the River Forth sees over 1000 "Dookers" take part, usually in fancy dress. Past costumes included a bubble wrap man, a giant lobster, and hula girls to name a few. There's even been the occasional brave groom-to-be dropping down on one knee to propose on the beach after their dip.

Over 1000 people go swimming in fancy dress on New Years Day in Edinburgh: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image: Copyright Lloyd Smith

Edinburgh Tattoo

Edinburgh Tattoo

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The word 'tattoo' comes from the cry of 'Doe den tap toe' ('Turn off the taps'), which was shouted at closing time in the Low Country inns during the 17th and 18th centuries. Back then, the local regiment would play music through the streets, letting the soldiers know it was time to go home. It then became a word to describe a form of military entertainment. Since the Tattoo officially started in 1950, not one performance has ever been cancelled.

Since the @EdinburghTattoo started in 1950, not one performance has been cancelled: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: The Royal Edinburgh Military Tattoo

Palace of Holyroodhouse

Palace of Holyroodhouse

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Her Majesty the Queen's official residence in Scotland was built on the foundation of an Augustinian abbey. In earlier times, it was where Mary Queen of Scots married both of her husbands, and even saw one of them murder her secretary, David Rizzio, in her apartments in 1566.

The Palace of Holyroof House was built on the foundations of an Augustinian abbey. http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Royal Collection Trust
© Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

Edinburgh Herons

Edinburgh Herons

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Herons can be spotted in the heart of the city along the Water of Leith Walkway. They're one of 80 species of bird you can see living by the water here and at Duddingston Loch, where they head at night. You may even spot them at Edinburgh Zoo as they often pop in for the penguin and pelican feeding times to snag a wayward fish.

Herons are one of 80 species of bird you can see along Edinburgh's Water of Leith Walkway: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Water of Leith
Image: Steve Morrison

The Water of Leith

The Water of Leith

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Back in the 12th century, grain mills were powered by the Water of Leith's current. You can still see some signs of the area's industrial past along the 12 3/4 mile Water of Leith Walkway, which is maintained by the Water of Leith Conservation Trust, who work to protect the water, pathways and wildlife in the area.

In 12th century Edinburgh, grain mills were powered by the Water of Leith's current. http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Water of Leith Conservation Trust

The Forth Road Bridge

The Forth Road Bridge

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When it opened in 1890, the Forth Bridge had one of the longest spans in the world at 1.5 miles. For a long time, the phrase "it's like painting the Forth Bridge" was used to describe a never-ending task, because by the time the bridge's paint job was finished, it was time to start again. But new techniques and products have rendered the phrase obsolete, and its next refresh isn't due until 2021.When it opened in 1890, the Forth Bridge had one of the longest spans in the world at 1.5 miles. For a long time, the phrase "it's like painting the Forth Bridge" was used to describe a never-ending task, because by the time the bridge's paint job was finished, it was time to start again. But new techniques and products have rendered the phrase obsolete, and its next refresh isn't due until 2021.When it opened in 1890, the Forth Bridge had one of the longest spans in the world at 1.5 miles. For a long time, the phrase "it's like painting the Forth Bridge" was used to describe a never-ending task, because by the time the bridge's paint job was finished, it was time to start again. But new techniques and products have rendered the phrase obsolete, and its next refresh isn't due until 2021.When it opened in 1890, the Forth Bridge had one of the longest spans in the world at 1.5 miles. For a long time, the phrase "it's like painting the Forth Bridge" was used to describe a never-ending task, because by the time the bridge's paint job was finished, it was time to start again. But new techniques and products have rendered the phrase obsolete, and its next refresh isn't due until 2021.When it opened in 1890, the Forth Bridge had one of the longest spans in the world at 1.5 miles. For a long time, the phrase "it's like painting the Forth Bridge" was used to describe a never-ending task, because by the time the bridge's paint job was finished, it was time to start again. But new techniques and products have rendered the phrase obsolete, and its next refresh isn't due until 2021.

When it opened, Edinburgh's Forth Bridge had one of the longest spans in the world. http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image: Gary Denham via Flickr creative commons

King Penguin Sir Nils Olav at Edinburgh Zoo

King Penguin Sir Nils Olav at Edinburgh Zoo

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One of Edinburgh Zoo's most famous residents is King Penguin Sir Nils Olav. He was knighted in 2008 after being adopted as the mascot of the Norwegian Royal Guard, which required approval from the then King of Norway. A bronze statue of Nils takes pride of place outside the zoo's penguin enclosure and you can see him daily at their world famous penguin parade.

One of @EdinburghZoo's penguins has been knighted. Find out which one: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
White Horse Close

White Horse Close

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Tucked away in Edinburgh's Old Town, White Horse Close was painstakingly restored to its former glory in the 1960s. Its authenticity is questionable, which is why it's been called "...a Hollywood dream of the seventeenth century". Nevertheless, it does preserve traditional Scottish features, and is believed to have been named after Mary Queen of Scots' favourite horse, which was stabled there.

Edinburgh's White Horse Close was named after Mary Queen of Scots' favourite horse. http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Edinburgh World Heritage
Image: Kim Traynor via Creative Commons

Tweeddale Court

Tweeddale Court

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The smallest listed building in Edinburgh can be found in Tweeddale Court. The stone-built shed next to the wall is a rare example of a sedan chair house. It dates back to the Georgian period, when sedan chairs provided a quick and efficient way of travelling around the city.

The smallest listed building in Edinburgh can be found in Tweeddale Court. Find out more: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Dean Village

Dean Village

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Dean Village was once the centre of the milling trade in Edinburgh. It's impossible to miss the imposing Well Court, which was recently restored with the help of Edinburgh World Heritage. Built in the 1880s as housing for local workers, they could rent a room for £7 to £12 per year.

Dean Village used to be the centre of the milling trade in Edinburgh. Find out more: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Morocco's Land

Morocco's Land

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Look up along Canongate and you'll see this figure, which is said to represent the Emperor of Morocco. The story goes that it was put there by a resident called Andrew Gray, who fled Edinburgh and ended up as a slave of the Emperor of Morocco. He escaped and returned to live in the city, and put the statue up - locals called it "Morocco's Land".

You can see a statue of the Emperor of Morocco high up in Edinburgh's Canongate: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Edinburgh World Heritage
Image: Kim Traynor via Wikimedia Creative Commons

Auld Reekie Roller Girls

Auld Reekie Roller Girls

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Auld Reekie Roller Girls is a women's flat track roller derby team. Based in Edinburgh, ARRG has 90 members, five of whom play for Team Scotland. They train three days a week and most members do powerlifting on days off. The ladies are renowned for their after-party antics, so much so that they even had a range of merchandise called Party ARRG which sold across the world.

Edinburgh has a flat track women's roller derby team, @auldreekierg. And they like to party... http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Morgan Flame

The door at the Beehive Inn

The door at the Beehive Inn

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The door to what was once the condemned cell from Calton Jail, which was demolished in 1935, is now upstairs in the Beehive Inn on the Grassmarket. The cell held murderers such as William Burke, a serial killer who committed the West Port murders during the 1800s.

The door to the condemned cell from Calton Jail is in the Beehive Inn, Edinburgh. http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Scottish Parliament

Scottish Parliament

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The site of the award-winning new Scottish Parliament has a varied history. It was once a medieval abbey, then from 1781 to the 1950s, it was also home to William Younger's brewery, which produced a quarter of all the beer in Scotland.

The new @ScotParl building used to be a medieval abbey and a brewery: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

© Scottish Parliamentary Corporate Body - 2012. Licensed under the Open Scottish Parliament Licence v1.0.

Museum of the Mound

Museum of the Mound

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As well as having one million pounds on show, one of the Mound's other exhibits is the tevau. This 9m long coil of feathers is currency in the Solomon Islands. Each coil takes a team of three men four months to make, and it gets its colour from the feathers of the cardinal honeyeater bird.

You can see what one million pounds looks like at the @museumonmound: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Courtesy Museum on the Mound

Mr Wood's Fossils

Mr Wood's Fossils

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This unusual shop was started in 1987 by Stan Wood, a self-taught fossil hunter, who was prompted to do so by visitors to the collection in his garage. One of Stan's most famous finds was the 330 million year old Bearsden Shark - as seen on the shop's logo - which he found while walking his dog by a stream in Glasgow in 1981.

The founder of @mrwoodsfossils once discovered a 330 million year old shark. http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Matt Dale c/o Mr Wood's Fossils

Callum at the Scottish National Gallery

Callum at the Scottish National Gallery

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Callum was a Dandie Dinmont terrier owned by Mr James Cowan Smith, who gave £55,000 to the Scottish National Gallery in 1919. But his donation came with two canine related conditions: the gallery had to provide for his dog Fury, who survived him. Secondly, John Emms' 1895 painting of Smith's previous dog Callum should always be on show. Both conditions were fulfilled, and although Fury is long dead, Callum's likeness still hangs in the Scottish National Gallery in memory of his owner.

There's a painting of a terrier hanging up in @NatGalleriesSco. Find out why: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Orphan's Staircase at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

Orphan's Staircase at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

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The Modern Two building at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art is the former Dean Orphan Hospital, built in the 1830s by Thomas Hamilton. The bud-like motif in the West Stairwell was painted by Turner Prize-winner Richard Wright, one of only a handful of permanent works he has made, and is said to represent the thousands of children who once passed through the halls. You'll also find unusually tall banisters in the galleries twin stairwells, which were designed to prevent the young children from falling.

The Modern Two building at @NatGalleriesSco used to be the Dean Orphan Hospital http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: © Richard Wright courtersy of National Galleries of Scotland

Scottish National Portrait Gallery

Scottish National Portrait Gallery

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Sir William Brassey Hole's beautifully detailed mural map of the night sky decorates the ceiling of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery's entrance hall, painted in the late 1890s. It features 2,222 individual gold stars set against the dark sky and 47 constellations, including the 12 signs of the zodiac, the Great Bear, Orion and Pegasus.

There are 2,222 individual gold stars on the ceiling of the Scottish National Portrait Gallery: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
The Scotsman Hotel

The Scotsman Hotel

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This hotel is the former home of The Scotsman newspaper, and it has retained a lot of its 19th Century baroque features. As well as oak-panelled walls and turrets, the North Bridge Brasserie & Bar (once the reception hall) still has the original marble pillars from the old building, and if you're heading to the meeting rooms, they're all named after famous former editors.

The @scotsman_hotel was the former home of The Scotsman newspaper: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: The Scotsman Hotel

Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

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Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh on 13th November 1850. It was while on holiday in Scotland in 1881 that Stevenson and his 12 year old stepson, Lloyd, drew a map of an imaginary "Treasure Island" on a rainy day, which he then created a story around to entertain his family. In 1883, Treasure Island was published, and his career as a writer took off.Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh on 13th November 1850. It was while on holiday in Scotland in 1881 that Stevenson and his 12 year old stepson, Lloyd, drew a map of an imaginary "Treasure Island" on a rainy day, which he then created a story around to entertain his family. In 1883, Treasure Island was published, and his career as a writer took off.Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh on 13th November 1850. It was while on holiday in Scotland in 1881 that Stevenson and his 12 year old stepson, Lloyd, drew a map of an imaginary "Treasure Island" on a rainy day, which he then created a story around to entertain his family. In 1883, Treasure Island was published, and his career as a writer took off.Robert Louis Stevenson was born in Edinburgh on 13th November 1850. It was while on holiday in Scotland in 1881 that Stevenson and his 12 year old stepson, Lloyd, drew a map of an imaginary "Treasure Island" on a rainy day, which he then created a story around to entertain his family. In 1883, Treasure Island was published, and his career as a writer took off.

Robert Louis Stevenson came up with Treasure Island on a rainy holiday in Scotland: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image: Public domain

Gilmerton Cove

Gilmerton Cove

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Gilmerton Cove is a network of underground hand carved passageways and chambers, whose origins are shrouded in mystery. Theories range from it being the work of an 18th century local blacksmith called George Paterson, who supposedly lived and is buried in the cove, to a drinking den for the gentry, or a smugglers lair.

Edinburgh's @GilmertonCove is a network of underground hand carved passageways: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Rosslyn Tours © Gilmerton Cove

Dr Joseph Bell

Dr Joseph Bell

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As well as being a famous Edinburgh surgeon and lecturer at the University of Edinburgh, Dr Bell was also Arthur Conan Doyle's inspiration for the great detective Sherlock Holmes. His house is now the Japanese consulate in Edinburgh, and the Japan Sherlock Holmes Club funded the plaque outside the building.

The character Sherlock Holmes was based on a lecturer at Edinburgh University: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: © Museum of London

Mary King's Close

Mary King's Close

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In 1645, Dr George Rae worked on Mary King's Close as Edinburgh's official plague doctor. Unlike his predecessors, he unexpectedly survived the plague, and then entered into a ten year fight with the council to get the salary he was owed. He won, and was paid an unprecedented yearly pension of £1,200 Scots, which would make him a millionaire in today's money.

In 1645, Edinburgh's official plague doctor had to fight for his salary after surviving the disease: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/

Credit: © The Real Mary King's Close

Rhubarb at Prestonfield

Rhubarb at Prestonfield

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Prestonfield House's restaurant Rhubarb is so named because the former owner of the house was the first person to successfully introduce rhubarb to Scotland. Sir Alexander Dick was awarded a gold medal for his horticultural efforts, and today there are also nods to rhubarb throughout the menu, with much of it being grown on-site.

The former owner of Prestonfield in Edinburgh first introduced rhubarb to Scotland: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Prestonfield

The Witchery

The Witchery

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Probably one of the most photographed hotels and restaurants in the world, the Witchery's building dates back to the 16th century. It has seven suites, and one of them is the Heriot suite, where you can take a bath in a small chapel. Downstairs, the restaurant has the biggest wine list in Scotland.

You can take a bath in a small chapel in @TheWitcheryEdin: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: The Witchery

Dominion Cinema

Dominion Cinema

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Designed by Thomas Bowhill Gibson, the city's leading cinema designer of the 1930s, the category B-listed Dominion still has many of the original Streamline Moderne features. The cinema opened on January 31st 1938, when Shirley Temple was the big draw in Wee Willie Winkie.

Edinburgh's @DominionCinema has been open since January 1938: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Dominion Cinema

Gorgie City Farm

Gorgie City Farm

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Edinburgh's city farm was once the site of a major waste depot, served by horse-drawn refuse carts, before becoming a civil defence training area during World War II. It was 1977 when a community group tackled the near-derelict site and helped open a working farm five years later. Now the charity-run farm welcomes thousands of visitors, as well as providing work placements for teenagers - and a home for these pigs.

Edinburgh's @gorgiecityfarm was a civil defence training area during World War II: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Bedlam Theatre

Bedlam Theatre

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Bedlam is the oldest student-run theatre in Britain, and home to the Edinburgh University Theatre Company, who are the longest running Edinburgh Fringe performers. The theatre was originally the New North Free Church, built in 1849 near the site of the Edinburgh Bedlam Mental Institute.

The Edinburgh University Theatre Company @BedlamTheatre are the longest running Fringe performers http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/

Image: Rory Moynihan via Flickr creative commons

Camera Obscura

Camera Obscura

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The camera obscura (it means "darkened room" in Latin) has been a popular attraction in Edinburgh since the early 18th century, making it the city's oldest purpose-built visitor attraction. By using what is essentially a pinhole camera, periscope and mirror, this "guide in the sky" gives you a unique view of the city. It has been updated since the 18th century, and you can now climb inside giant kaleidoscopes and see other digital illusions.

Edinburgh's @camobscura attraction has been running since the early 18th century: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
St Margaret's Chapel

St Margaret's Chapel

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This is the oldest surviving building in Edinburgh. The chapel is an example of Romanesque architecture, and it was built in the 12th century, before falling into disuse after the Reformation. It has since been refurbished twice, and is still used for religious services today.

St Margaret's Chapel is the oldest surviving building in Edinburgh: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: © Courtesy of Historic Scotland

St Giles' Cathedral

St Giles' Cathedral

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This shield with the arms of Edinburgh is one of the many carvings inside St Giles' Cathedral. The coat of arms have been visible for a long time, but the two huge faces (or 'Green Men') holding it were only spotted a few years ago, after the new lighting in St Giles' made it possible to see a lot more detail in the carved ceilings.

Look out for the detail on the arms of Edinburgh carving inside St Giles' Cathedral: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: © St Giles Cathedral

The Innocent Railway Tunnel

The Innocent Railway Tunnel

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Scotland's first railway went from Edinburgh to Dalkeith, and was better known as the "Innocent Railway". The name either comes from the fact that no one died during the construction of the track, while others believe it refers to its humble beginnings. The atmospheric St Leonard's Tunnel runs under Holyrood Park, and is now a walking and cycle path.

The old Innocent Railway tunnel that runs under Holyrood Park was Scotland's first: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

© Copyright Jim Barton and licensed for reuse.

Colinton

Colinton

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Colinton Village was the childhood stomping ground of Robert Louis Stevenson, whose grandfather was the minister of the local church. A local community group has created a walk through the village with his poetry along it, culminating in a statue of of the author as a small boy with his pet dog, outside his grandfather's church.

Robert Louis Stevenson's grandfather was the minister of a local church in Colinton Village: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: City of Literature

The Sheep Heid Inn

The Sheep Heid Inn

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Drinks have been served at Scotland's oldest pub since as far back as 1360. Royal visitors have been a feature at the Sheep Heid Inn, with James VI even presenting the landlord with an embellished ram's head snuff box. A recent revamp retained the original features, such as the country's last traditional pub skittle alley.

The Sheep Heid Inn in Edinburgh has been serving drinks since 1360. Find out more: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Rebecca W via Flickr creative commons

King's Theatre

King's Theatre

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Also known as the 'Old Lady of Leven Street', this theatre first opened its doors in 1906. In 2013 the famous 85 meter-squared dome was redesigned by painter and playwright, John Byrne. The new mural "All the World's a Stage" took a team five weeks to complete.

The King's Theatre in Edinburgh first opened its doors in 1906. Find out more: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: © The Festival City Theatres Trust
Image: Amanda Fraser

Dundas House dome

Dundas House dome

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Next time you've got a Royal Bank of Scotland's five pound note in your hands, look a little more closely at the design. In the background is a dome, covered in stars, and this is in fact the view from the hall in the bank's historic head office.

The dome design on a Royal Bank of Scotland £5 note can be seen in the bank's head office: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/
Waverely Station

Waverely Station

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Edinburgh's iconic Waverley Station is the only railway terminus in the world to be named after a novel. "Waverley", dubbed the first ever historical novel, was also Sir Walter Scott's first.

Edinburgh's Waverley is the only station in the world to be named after a novel http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
National Library of Scotland

National Library of Scotland

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Alongside the 24 million printed items in the National Library of Scotland are two million maps - one of the world's largest collections.

There are 2 million maps in the @natlibscot and 24 million printed items: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Public Domain

Trinity House

Trinity House

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Trinity House in Leith is home to a maritime museum, filled with items brought back to the port of Leith by sailors over the centuries. Their collection includes navigational instruments, models of ships, furniture, paintings and even a 200-year-old whaling harpoon. One of the more exotic items is a Gentoo penguin egg, which was collected by Leith sailors stationed at Paradise Bay in the south Atlantic.

There's a Gentoo penguin egg in the Trinity House maritime museum in Leith: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: © Courtesy of Historic Scotland

Craigmillar Castle

Craigmillar Castle

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This ruined castle dates back to the 15th century and its history is linked to Mary Queen of Scots, who fled to Craigmillar following the murder of her secretary, David Rizzio. The entrance to the castle is flanked by a pair of very old Yew trees, and which are believed to have provided wood for bows and arrows.

The yew trees at Craigmillar Castle in Edinburgh once provided wood for bow and arrows: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: © Courtesy of Historic Scotland

Dunbars Close Garden

Dunbars Close Garden

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This hidden green space was created in the style of a 17th century walled garden, and is one of the few open to the public along the Royal Mile. It was originally created by a Scottish biologist who wanted to create a network of gardens for residents and local brewery workers, and was restored in 1978 based on old 17th century maps.

Dunbars Close Garden is one of the Royal Mile's most beautiful but hidden spots: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Edinburgh World Heritage
Image: Sir Gawain via Creative Commons

Cafe Royal

Café Royal

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The Victorian and Baroque surroundings of Café Royal haven't been altered since it moved to its current location in 1863. Among the stained glass and fine late Victorian plasterwork are a series of irreplaceable Doulton ceramic murals, painted by John Eyre.

There's a series of John Eyre Doulton murals in Edinburgh's Cafe Royal: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Dovecot Studios

Dovecot Studios

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Dovecot Tapestry studio is housed in a restored Victorian swimming baths in the centre of Edinburgh. Using skills that have been passed down by generations of Dovecot Apprentices, the present day weavers are commissioned by private and public collectors from all over the world to create tapestries and rugs. They've worked with artists such as Stanley Spencer, Henry Moore and David Hockney.

The tapestry weavers @dovecotstudios work in a restored Victorian swimming baths: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Dovecot Studios / Antonia Reeve

Portobello Beach

Portobello Beach

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Portobello is a blue flag beach which stretches for two miles on the outskirts of Edinburgh. The ice cream shop owned by the Arcari family, which was originally at 99 Portobello High Street, was reportedly the origin of the iconic "99" cone.

An ice cream shop on Edinburgh's Portobello Beach invented the '99' cone: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: ©The City of Edinburgh Council

Leith Links Golf Club

Leith Links Golf Club

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Leith Links is where the first recorded rules of golf were created back in 1744. The list at the time had 13 articles and laws laid out, and etiquette was strict: number six stated "If your Balls be found any where touching one another, you are to lift the first ball, till you play the last."

Leith Links is where the first recorded rules of golf were created back in 1744. http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Edinburgh World Heritage
Image: Steve Collis via Flickr Creative Commons

Advocate's Close

Advocate's Close

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Like many Edinburgh backstreets, Advocate's Close was named after one of its renowned residents, Advocate of Scotland, Sir James Stewart of Goodtrees. Dating back to the 15th century, the buildings have now been converted into apartments, offices and a bar and restaurant, with original features still in place. The success of the recent restoration won it the prestigious RIAS Andrew Doolan Best Building in Scotland Award in 2014.

Edinburgh's C15th Advocate's Close won the Best Building in Scotland award in 2014: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Edinburgh World Heritage http://www.ewht.org.uk/ Image: Jo Harris-Cooksley

The Speculative Society at the Old College

The Speculative Society at the Old College

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The candlelit, secretive meetings of one of Scotland's last remaining "men only" clubs have been held in The Old College at Edinburgh University since 1764. The society, founded to debate and promote literature, was recently told to admit female members or face eviction from their A-Listed rooms, which were designed by two of Scotland's most famous architects; William Henry Playfair and Robert Adam.

The Old College at Edinburgh University is home to the Speculative Society: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Edinburgh World Heritage
Image: Rusaila Bazlamit via Flickr Creative Commons

Edinburgh Farmers' Market

Edinburgh Farmers' Market

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More than 50 specialist producers sell their wares in Edinburgh's original farmers market every Saturday, between 9am and 2pm, on the terrace underneath the castle. Expect to find everything from exotic Water Buffalo to traditional Scottish treats like Tablet on sale.

More than 50 specialist producers lay out stalls every week at @EdFarmersMarket http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Under the Regent Bridge

Under the Regent Bridge

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The underside of the Regent Bridge is now a public work of art, and anyone travelling under the previously dark and dingy arch will see a random order of coloured light. It was designed so no journey looks the same, and was commissioned by the Edinburgh Art Festival and Ingleby Gallery in 2012.

The underside of Edinburgh's Regent Bridge is now a public work of art: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Callum Innes, The Regent Bridge, 2012.
Image: Stuart Armitt

Summerhall

Summerhall

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Summerhall is now a creative artistic hub, but it was also the Royal (Dick) School of Veterinary Studies from 1913 to 1925. The surviving Anatomy Lecture Theatre is the last of its kind; the wooden, curved, tiered seating and vaulted sky light make it a richly preserved room.

The Anatomy Lecture Theatre @summerhallery in Edinburgh is the last of its kind: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Summerhall

James Simpson

James Simpson

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Dr James Simpson was the inventor of anaesthesia, and pioneered the use of chloroform during childbirth. He tested out various methods on friends and family at dinner parties before making his breakthrough. Although he's buried in Edinburgh, his status in medicine meant he was given a plaque at Westminster Abbey, which reads "To whose genius and benevolence, The world owes the blessings derived, From the use of chloroform for, The relief of suffering, Laus Deo".

Edinburgh's Dr James Simpson was the inventor of anaesthesia: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Jo Harris-Cooksley

Gladstone's Land

Gladstone's Land

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The gilded bird of prey hovering outside the National Trust of Scotland's Gladstone's Land tenement museum reflects the name of the former owner, Thomas Gledstanes. "Gled" is an old Scottish word for the red-tailed kite, extinct in Scotland by 1917, and the bird's favourite nesting haunt of stones (or "stanes") creates the unusual surname.

The @N_T_S Gladstone's Land tenement museum is named after its former owner: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Kim Traynor via Creative Commons

Rose Street

Rose Street

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At one time, Rose Street was referred to as the "Amber Mile" due to the huge number of bars along it. The actual name is reflected in eight mosaics along the street, all with a slightly different rose design. But it's also known as the location of a drinking game, The Rose Street Challenge, where the slightly ambitious aim is to drink a pint in every bar or pub.

Edinburgh's Rose Street was referred to as the 'Amber Mile' because it had so many pubs: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Stuart Caie

Old Calton Burial Ground

Old Calton Burial Ground

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Among the gravestones here are memorials to the philosopher David Hume, the publisher William Blackwood, civil engineer Robert Stephenson, and mathematician John Playfair.

Philosopher David Hume is buried in the Old Calton Burial Ground in Edinburgh: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Jo Harris-Cooksley

Collective

Collective

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Edinburgh's famous City Dome is now home to a contemporary art gallery, called Collective. They are working with City of Edinburgh Council, Edinburgh World Heritage and other partners to restore the City Observatory and create another gallery space and restaurant on the site. Collective shows artists who are emerging on the international stage and have a development programme for emergent artists based in Scotland, called Satellites Programme

Edinburgh's City Observatory is home to contemporary art gallery, @1984_Collective http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Time ball on the Nelson Monument

Time ball on the Nelson Monument

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The Nelson Monument contains a time ball which is still dropped at 1 o'clock daily (except Sunday). Its original purpose was to help ship's captains set their chronometers accurately before setting sail. However as it wasn't visible on foggy days, the one o'clock gun was also introduced in 1861.

Edinburgh's Nelson Monument has a time ball which is still dropped at 1 o'clock daily: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

The Gardens at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

The Gardens at the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art

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In 2004 the grounds of the Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art were designed and landscaped into a stepped, serpentine mound with a series of crescent-shaped pools of water. The artwork, called Landform Ueda, is a garden and social space in one, and covers an area of more than 3,000 metres squared, rising to a height of seven metres.

Even the grounds at the @NatGalleriesSco Gallery of Modern Art are landscaped artwork: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: © National Galleries of Scotland

Dame Muriel Spark

Dame Muriel Spark

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The teacher in this photo is Miss Christina Kay at the James Gillespie's High School for Girls, who was the inspiration for writer Dame Muriel Spark's most iconic character, Jean Brodie. Her famous novel, 'The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie' was later made into a film starring Dame Maggie Smith, and is one of the best depictions of Edinburgh on celluloid.

Dame Muriel Spark's iconic character Jean Brodie was based on her high school teacher: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Credit: Courtesy of the National Library of Scotland

Cramond Island

Cramond Island

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This abandoned island lies a mile from the coast in the Firth of Forth. It can only be reached by a small causeway when the tide is right, and was used during World War II as a defence to stop submarines and enemy war ships from sneaking up the river's channel.

Cramond Island is a mile from the coast in the Firth of Forth, and reachable when the tide is right: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/

Image credit: Chris Combe via Flickr Creative Commons

Witches Well

Witches Well

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This cast iron wall fountain by Edinburgh Castle marks the site where more than 300 women are believed to have been burnt at the stake for being "witches". The images on the fountain symbolise objects with a dual purpose, such as the serpent and a Foxglove spray plant, which is known for its beauty and toxicity.

A fountain marks the site where over 300 witches were burnt at the stake in Edinburgh: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Jo Harris-Cooksley

Maggie Dickson's Pub

Maggie Dickson's Pub

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The Grassmarket's pub names represent a gruesome past: The Last Drop refers to the area's history of hanging, while Maggie Dicksons commemorates the only known woman to survive her execution in Scotland. "Half-Hangit Maggie" lived on for another 25 years after coming round in her coffin.

Some of the pub names in @GrassmarketEdin have pretty gruesome stories behind them: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
lilies at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

Lilies at the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh

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In summer, the Victoria water lilies can take the weight of a small child. The lilies are supported by a network of ribs, and the air trapped between them keeps them buoyant. The plants are thriving in the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, which houses one of the world's largest living collections of plants.

In summer, the Victoria water lilies @thebotanics can take the weight of a small child. http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
The Bow Well

The Bow Well

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The Bow Well is where Edinburgh first got its piped water supply from. It was built in 1681 and designed by King Charles II's Master Mason, Robert Mylne, who also oversaw his uncle's plans for Holyrood House's transformation.

Edinburgh's first piped water supply came from the Bow Well in @GrassmarketEdin http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
William Burke, the Edinburgh 'bodysnatcher'

William Burke, the Edinburgh 'bodysnatcher'

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This calling card case is made from skin taken from the left hand of the infamous body snatcher, William Burke. It was bought at auction for £1,050 in 1988 from a descendent of one of the surgeons involved in his dissection. Experts on the BBC's Antiques Roadshow programme described the case as "priceless", and it's now on display at The Cadies & Witchery Tours shop in West Bow.

In Edinburgh? Ask @adam_lyal to show you the card case made from bodysnatcher William Burke http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Greyfriars Kirkyard

Greyfriars Kirkyard

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Greyfriar's Kirkyard became a burial ground in 1562. It's supposedly haunted by George 'Bluidy' MacKenzie (or the 'MacKenzie Poltergeist'), and the grave of one Thomas Riddell is said to have inspired JK Rowling when coming up with Lord Voldemort's real name. So if you see any Harry Potter fans hanging around, that's why.

Greyfriar's Kirkyard contains the grave of Thomas Riddell, otherwise known as Voldemort: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Lilian via Flickr Creative Commons

The Grassmarket

The Grassmarket

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The Grassmarket was first used as a market in the 1300s. It was originally used for cattle, which were stabled, fattened and butchered here. This stopped in the 17th century, but there have been markets and trading in the area ever since, with the modern market paying homage to its history.

The original @GrassmarketEdin started in the 1300s and was used for cattle: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Greyfriars Bobby

Greyfriars Bobby

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On George IV Bridge there's a tribute to the most loyal dog in the country. The legend goes that Skye Terrier Bobby spent 14 years guarding the grave of his owner until he himself died in 1872. The much-loved local canine character was honoured with a statue which visitors rub for luck.

On George IV Bridge in Edinburgh, there's a tribute to the most loyal dog in the country: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Armstrongs Vintage Emporium

Armstrongs Vintage Emporium

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Armstrongs Vintage Clothing Emporium was established in 1840, making it one of the longest running retro stores in Edinburgh. It looks like a tiny shop from the outside, but inside the back opens up to reveal clothing and accessories from across the decades, stretching back to Victorian times.

Armstrongs Vintage Clothing Emporium (est 1840) is one of the oldest retro stores in Edinburgh. http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
Museum of Childhood

Museum of Childhood

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This is the world's first museum dedicated to toys and childhood, and is home to the famous Stanbrig Eorls dolls house which has 2,000 tiny items within it. The museum's previous occupants include Jane, the daughter of Lady Maxwell of Monreith. She lived on the second floor in the 1760s, and was once spotted riding a pig along the High Street.

The Stanbrig Eorls dolls house in Edinburgh's Museum of Childhood has 2,000 items inside: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Kim Traynor via Creative Commons

Tolbooth Tavern

Tolbooth Tavern

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The Tolbooth Tavern first started serving drinks in 1820. Before this, it had a grim history as a prison, known for the brutal treatment of inmates who were often wrongly detained. The name comes from its other function as a tolbooth, or Council Chamber, which collected payments from travellers coming into the burgh.

The Tolbooth Tavern on Edinburgh's Royal Mile first started serving drinks in 1820. http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Jo Harris-Cooksley

Deacon Brodie

Deacon Brodie

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Deacon William Brodie was the real-life inspiration for Robert Louis Stevenson's Jekyll and Hyde. By day a respected cabinet maker, he'd burgle the very homes he had visited at night. Eventually he was caught and hanged, ironically from a gibbet of his own design.

Edinburgh local Deacon William Brodie was the inspiration for Jekyll and Hyde. http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Jo Harris-Cooksley

The Royal Mile

The Royal Mile

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One of the most historic streets in the world is perched on a extinct volcano. During the ice age, glaciers carved out the path of the road, which is actually the length of a Scottish mile - slightly longer than the English distance.

The path of Edinburgh's Royal Mile was carved out by glaciers during the ice age: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Jo Harris-Cooksley

The Ox' and Inspector Rebus

The Ox' and Inspector Rebus

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This pub might be small, but it has a few famous links to literature. Edinburgh-based author Ian Rankin's most famous character, Inspector Rebus, liked to hang out here, and it's also referenced by author Sydney Goodsir Smith in his 1947 comic novel, Carotid Cornucopius.

The Oxford Bar in Edinburgh is the favourite hangout of Ian Rankin's Inspector Rebus: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: David Coggins via Flickr Creative Commons

The last Edinburgh trams

The last Edinburgh trams

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Edinburgh's trams were horse drawn up until 1907, when they were made electric. They started to be phased out in the 1950s, with the last tram passing out of service in November 1956. Anyone who took a tram during the last week would have received a commemorative ticket like, and the final procession of trams was watched by enormous crowds along the way. There's now one 14km tram route, running from Edinburgh Airport to York Place in the city centre.

Edinburgh's trams were horse drawn up until 1907, when they were made electric. http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
James Craig's plan of the New Town

James Craig's plan of the New Town

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James Craig was 26 when he won the competition to design a plan for Edinburgh's proposed New Town. The plans, which date from 1767, are on display between 12-2pm every day at the Museum of Edinburgh to protect them from the damaging effects of light.

James Craig was 26 when he won the competition to design Edinburgh's New Town. http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com
The Ross Fountain

The Ross Fountain

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This fountain was once described by opponents as "'grossly indecent and disgusting" as well as "disgraceful to the City", but has since become one of Edinburgh's most photographed landmarks. The female nudity was a bit much for some members of the Victorian establishment, who insisted it was placed in a relatively secluded location.

Edinburgh's Ross Fountain was once described as 'grossly indecent and disgusting' http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

Image credit: Guido Strotheide via Flickr Creative Commons

World's End Close

World's End Close

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This ominous sounding close got its name in the days when you had to pay a fee to get back into Edinburgh after leaving. As the poverty stricken residents living within the walls of the city couldn't afford to go any further, it was the end of their own world.

In Edinburgh, there's an ominous sounding side street called World's End Close. Find out where: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/

Image credit: Jo Harris-Cooksley

Hibernian FC & Heart of Midlothian FC

Hibernian FC & Heart of Midlothian FC

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The only time a Scottish Cup Final has been played outside of Glasgow was back in 1896, when Hearts beat Hibs 3-1 at Logie Green in Edinburgh. The next time the two sides would meet in the same stage of the same competition was in 2012, when Hearts defeated Hibs 5-1 at Hampden Park.

The only time a Scottish Cup Final has been played outside of Glasgow was in 1896: http://www.lastminute.com/inspiration/100-things-to-do-in-edinburgh/ via @lastminute_com

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Top image: Adaption of 'Edinburgh old town at night' by KeithEdinburgh.
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